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After a Flood: Returning Home Safely

Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede. Listen to a radio or television and don’t return home until authorities indicate it is safe to do so. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance, such as people with infants, elderly people, and people with disabilities.

  • If your home, apartment or business has suffered damage, call the insurance company or agent who handles your flood insurance policy right away to file a claim.
  • Before entering a building, inspect foundations for cracks or other damage. Don't go in if there is any chance of the building collapsing.
  • Upon entering the building, don't use matches, cigarette lighters or any other open flames, since gas may be trapped inside. Instead, use a flashlight to light your way.
  • Keep power off until an electrician has inspected your system for safety.
  • Floodwaters pick up sewage and chemicals from roads, farms and factories. If your home has been flooded, protect your family’s health by cleaning up your house right away. Throw out foods and medicines that may have met floodwater.
  • Until local authorities proclaim your water supply to be safe, boil water for drinking and food preparation vigorously for five minutes before using.
  • Be careful walking around. After a flood, steps and floors are often slippery with mud and covered with debris, including nails and broken glass.
  • Take steps to reduce your risk of future floods. Make sure to follow local building codes and ordinances when rebuilding, and use flood-resistant materials and techniques to protect yourself and your property from future flood damage.

Inspecting Utilities In A Damaged Home

Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.

Look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician for advice.

Check for sewage and water line damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid the water from the tap. You can obtain safe water by melting ice cubes.

Protecting Your Home for the Future

One of the most important things that you can do to protect your home and family before a flood is to purchase a flood insurance policy. You can obtain one through your insurance company or agent. Flood insurance is guaranteed through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Most homeowners' insurance does not cover flood damage. Don't wait until a flood is coming to purchase your policy. It normally takes 30 days after purchase for a flood insurance policy to go into effect.

Resources Are Available – Call your Magellan WorkLife Solutions Program at 1-800-234-1327

Additional information, self-help tools and other resources are available online at www.MagellanHealth.com/member. Or call us for more information, help and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

 


Coping With Floods - Aftermath

Coping with the Aftermath of a Flood

A flood can leave a trail of structural destruction, but what about the emotional impact? The full force of the disaster is often realized after the floodwaters recede and emergency crews go home. In addition to the clean-up efforts, it’s important that you devote time to restoring your own emotional wellness. Feelings of grief, despair and frustration are normal reactions to such events. Other emotions you may be experiencing include:

  • Panic/Feeling out of control
  • Despair
  • Disorientation/Confusion
  • Guilt
  • Shock/Numbness
  • Anger
  • Anxiety/Uncertainty
  • Grief

 

Coping Tips

  • Following the coping techniques outlined below can help you deal with the range of emotions you are most likely experiencing:
  • Be extra patient. Don’t expect things to instantly restore themselves. Accept that restoration (both physical and emotional) takes time.
  • Realize that you will experience a range of emotions, and moods can change unexpectedly.
  • Don’t overlook the feelings of children as you deal with the situation. They need to feel that they can count on you for extra attention, love and support.
  • Try to keep your family diet as nourishing as possible for needed energy.
  • Focus on the big picture, instead of the little details and little problems. It will give you a sense of competency.
  • Talk with friends, family, counselors or members of the clergy. In crisis situations, a supportive network is essential.
  • Try to get at least seven to eight hours of sleep a night to refresh your mind and body for the next day’s activities.
  • Make a list of things that need to be done and rank them by what needs to be done first, second, third, etc.
  • Learn acceptance. Don’t worry about things you cannot control. Conserve your energies for things you can control.

Adapted from materials provided by North Dakota State University Extension Services

 

Getting Help

The FAA WorkLife Solutions Program provides many resources and services to help you and your family. To receive further assistance, call your program at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006, or log on to www.MagellanHealth.com/Member to begin accessing these free services available today.

           

This document is for your information only. It is not meant to give medical advice. It should not be used to replace a visit with a provider. Magellan Health Services does not endorse other resources that may be mentioned here.

 


Coping With Floods – Preparation

If you live near a body of water, at some point your community may be threatened by a flood. Floods are among the most frequent and costly natural disasters, causing almost 90 percent of damage related to natural disasters. Since 1990, floods have caused more than 900 deaths and cost, on average, more than $4 billion per year.

Flash flooding can occur anywhere — at any time of year — and it usually happens within six hours of a severe rainstorm. Flash floods can roll boulders, tear out trees and destroy buildings and bridges. Rapidly rising water can reach heights of 30 feet or more, and flash flood-producing rains can trigger catastrophic mudslides. Unlike flash floods, river or coastal flooding is a long-term event that may occur after some warning and last for a week or more.

Although timely warnings have greatly diminished flood fatalities in the United States, property damage continues to mount from such events since there is little that can be done to stop a flood once it has started. To help you protect yourself and your family, this digest offers tips and strategies on how to prepare for and cope with a flood.

Preparing for a Flood

As a safety precaution, learn about your community’s risk for floods by contacting your local emergency management office, planning and zoning department or local weather service office. They can usually provide valuable information on how to safeguard your home and how to react when a flood threatens. In addition, the following tips may help:

  • Keep a supply of flashlights and batteries on hand.
  • Regularly check battery-operated radios and televisions to make sure they work.
  • Keep insurance policies, legal documents and other valuables in a safe deposit box or waterproof container.
  • Develop an evacuation plan with your family.
  • Make sure one or more of the family’s cars is always reliable in case you need to get out of town quickly.
  • Talk to your insurance agent. Consider purchasing or renewing flood, home and automobile insurance policies.
  • Have backflow valves installed in your plumbing’s sewer traps to prevent flood waters from backing up into the drains of your home.
  • Assemble a disaster supplies kit that contains: a first aid kit, canned food and can opener, at least three gallons of water per person, protective clothing and rainwear, bedding and/or sleeping bags, a battery-powered radio and flashlights (including extra batteries) and any essential items for children, pets or elderly and/or disabled family members (medications, diapers, warm clothing, etc.).
  • Make a list of items to bring inside in case a flood threatens (patio furniture, lawn decorations, tools, trash cans, planters, etc.).
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts so water is able to drain properly.
  • If you live near the water, consider elevating your home to make it more resistant to flood-driven waters. (Check with your town’s planning and zoning official for approval.)
  • Raise your furnace, water heater and electric panel if they are in areas of your home that may be flooded.
  • Seal walls and openings in basements with water-proofing compounds to avoid seepage through cracks.
  • Take photographs of your home for insurance purposes.
  • If you have a boat, determine where you can store it in the event of a flood.
  • Plan for pet safety. Contact local animal shelters for emergency housing information for pets.
  • Keep an emergency fund of cash in the house.
  • Write down instructions for how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you’ll need a professional to turn them back on after the emergency is over.)
  • Identify places to go if you are told to evacuate your house. Choose several places: a friend’s home in another town, a motel or an emergency shelter.

 

Note — Even six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock an average-sized adult off his or her feet, and a depth of two feet will float a car. Never try to walk, swim or drive through a flood, especially if the water is moving swiftly. If you come upon flood waters, stop, turn around and find an alternate route.

 

When a Flood Threatens

A “flood watch” means that a flood is possible in your area. A “flood warning” means flooding is already occurring or will occur soon in your area. If a “flood watch” or “flood warning” has been issued for your area by the National Weather Service, protect yourself and your property by taking the safety precautions listed previously, if you have not done so already. In addition, listen regularly to your local radio or television stations for updated information on the impending flood.

If you are told to evacuate, do so as quickly as possible. Go to designated community shelter areas or stay inland with family or friends. If possible, notify a relative or friend in another part of the country of your plans and your whereabouts. Listen to instructions carefully and allow yourself as much time as possible. Roads may be crowded and already flooded in parts, so the sooner you evacuate, the safer you will be.

If you are not instructed to evacuate, stay indoors on the highest level possible. Take additional disaster precautions by storing drinking water in clean bathtubs, sinks, bottles, and pots and pans and, if power is lost, turn off major appliances to reduce a power “surge” when electricity is restored. Note — In most instances, you should evacuate from a mobile home if a flood warning is issued.

Getting Help

The FAA WorkLife Solutions Program provides many resources and services to help you and your family.  To receive further assistance, call your program at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006, or log on to www.MagellanHealth.com/Member to begin accessing these free services available today.

 

This document is for your information only. It is not meant to give medical advice. It should not be used to replace a visit with a provider. Magellan Health Services does not endorse other resources that may be mentioned here.

 


Coping With Floods – During a Flood

What to do while flooding occurs:

You’ve done everything in your power to prepare for a flood. You’ve secured a flood insurance policy, and made your home flood-ready. Now, the floodwaters are rising, and there’s nothing you can do to stop them. But there are things you can do to make sure your family stays safe until the water levels drop again.

  • Fill bathtubs, sinks, and jugs with clean water in case water becomes contaminated.
  • Listen to a battery-operated radio for the latest storm information.
  • If local authorities instruct you to do so, turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve.
  • If told to evacuate your home, do so immediately.
  • If the waters start to rise inside your house before you have evacuated, retreat to the second floor, the attic, and if necessary, the roof.
  • Floodwaters may carry raw sewage, chemical waste and other disease-spreading substances. If you’ve come in contact with floodwaters, wash your hands with soap and disinfected water.
  • Avoid walking through floodwaters. As little as six inches of moving water can knock you off your feet.
  • Don’t drive through a flooded area. If you come upon a flooded road, turn around and go another way. A car can be carried away by just two feet of flood water.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires.
  • Look out for animals – especially snakes. Animals lose their homes in floods, too.

The best way to prevent harm during a flood is to be prepared with information and supplies. Remember that flood conditions change rapidly and severe flooding can develop in minutes.

Flood water levels can be much deeper than they appear. The depth of water may be difficult to assess. Only two feet of water can cause a car to be swept away, and as little as six inches can cause unstable footing.

Never try to drive through floodwater. Water can be deeper than it appears, and water levels can rise very quickly. If a car stalls in floodwater, get out quickly and move to higher ground. Do not walk or drive through flood waters. More people drown in their cars during a flood than anywhere else.

Floods and storms can also knock down power lines. If you lose power, never use a gas oven, range, barbecue, hibachi, or portable propane heater to heat your home. These units use up the oxygen you need to breathe and give off deadly carbon monoxide which have caused people to die from suffocation.

If you see downed power lines, do not try to repair or grab them. Even when flood water levels appear to have subsided, electrical currents can travel through the remaining water for more than 100 yards. Contact your utility company or police department to report downed power lines.

If your well has been flooded, assume the water in your home has been contaminated. If you are on a public water system, listen to your radio and television for news from public health departments to find out if your water is contaminated. If water is contaminated, bottled water is the best choice. If you can, get commercially bottled water that has been stored for less than six months in tightly sealed containers. Plan for one gallon per person per day.

Flood waters may carry silt, raw sewage, oil or chemical waste. Wash your hands frequently with soap and disinfected water to prevent spread of disease. This should be done before preparing or eating food, after toilet use, and after flood clean up when your hands may have touched articles contaminated from water or sewage. When in doubt, throw out fresh, frozen or dry food, such as cereal, that may have been in contact with the water.

If you can, wear gloves and boots at all times to avoid touching anything with bare hands or feet. Parents should not allow children to play in flood areas and should ensure that their children wash hands often.

To be better prepared for an emergency, keep a battery operated radio and a flashlight on hand. For more information, contact your local health department or emergency management agency.

If Your Home is Flooded

  • Utilities should be turned off. Don’t turn them on until notified that it is safe to do so.
  • Avoid weakened structures, particularly floors, walls, and rooftops to avoid structural damage.
  • Do not pump basement out until flood water recedes.

Drinking Water

  • If your well has been flooded, assume the water in your home has been contaminated. Use the directions at the end of this sheet to disinfect your well.
  • If you are receive water from public source, your local health jurisdiction will let you know, through local media, if your water is not safe to drink.
  • Bottled water is the best choice. If you can, get commercially bottled water that has been stored for less than six months in tightly sealed containers. Plan for one gallon per person per day.

Getting Help

The FAA WorkLife Solutions Program provides many resources and services to help you and your family.  To receive further assistance, call your program at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006, or log on to www.MagellanHealth.com/Member to begin accessing these free services available today.

 

 

This document is for your information only. It is not meant to give medical advice. It should not be used to replace a visit with a provider. Magellan Health Services does not endorse other resources that may be mentioned here.

 


Coping with Tornados

Tornados can happen during any time of year day or night.  Knowing what to do when you see a tornado, or when you hear a tornado warning can help protect you and your family. During a tornado, people face hazards from extremely high winds and risk being struck by flying and falling objects. After a tornado, the wreckage left behind poses additional injury risks. Although nothing can be done to prevent tornadoes, there are steps you can take for your health and safety.

Injuries

Injury may result from the direct impact of a tornado, or it may occur after the storm, when people walk among debris and enter damaged buildings. Common causes of injury included falling objects and heavy, rolling objects. Because tornadoes often damage power lines, gas lines, or electrical systems, there is a risk of fire, electrocution, or an explosion. Protecting yourself and your family requires promptly treating any injuries suffered during the storm and using extreme care to avoid further hazards.

Inspecting the Damage

  • After a tornado, be aware of possible structural, electrical, or gas-leak hazards in your home. Contact your local city or county building inspectors for information on structural safety codes and standards. They may also offer suggestions on finding a qualified contractor to do work for you.
  • If you suspect any damage to your home, shut off electrical power, natural gas, and propane tanks to avoid fire, electrocution, or explosions.
  • If it is dark when you are inspecting your home, use a flashlight rather than a candle or torch to avoid the risk of fire or explosion in a damaged home.
  • If you see frayed wiring or sparks, or if there is an odor of something burning, you should immediately shut off the electrical system at the main circuit breaker if you have not done so already.
  • If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open all windows, and leave the house immediately. Notify the gas company, the police or fire departments, or State Fire Marshal’s office, and do not turn on the lights, light matches, smoke, or do anything that could cause a spark. Do not return to your house until you are told it is safe to do so.

Safety During Clean Up

  • Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves, and gloves.
  • Learn proper safety procedures and operating instructions before operating any gas-powered or electric-powered saws or tools.
  • Clean up spilled medicines, drugs, flammable liquids, and other potentially hazardous materials.

Children’s Needs

After a tornado, children may be afraid the storm will come back again and they will be injured or left alone. Children may even interpret disasters as punishment for real or imagined misdeeds. Explain that a tornado is a natural event. Children will be less likely to experience prolonged fear or anxiety if they know what to expect after a tornado. Here are some suggestions:

  • Talk about your own experiences with severe storms, or read aloud a book about tornadoes.
  • Encourage your child to express feelings of fear. Listen carefully and show understanding.
  • Offer reassurance. Tell your child that the situation is not permanent, and provide physical reassurance through time spent together and displays of affection.
  • Include your child in clean-up activities. It is comforting to children to watch the household begin to return to normal and to have a job to do.

NOTE: Symptoms of anxiety may not appear for weeks or even months after a tornado; they can affect people of any age. If anxiety disrupts daily activities for any member of your family, seek professional assistance through your Employee Assistance Program.

Resources Are Available

The FAA WorkLife Solutions Program provides many resources and services to help you and your family. To receive further assistance, call your program at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006, or log on to www.MagellanHealth.com/Member to begin accessing these free services available today.


Additional tools and resources:

 


Coping with Wildfires

If you live in Colorado or other states, you may be coping with the aftermath of recent wildfires. Wildfires occur in almost all states and typically ignite during dry, hot weather and especially during droughts. Most often, they are started accidentally and spread quickly, jumping from brush to trees and even homes. Since wildfires are difficult to contain, damage to property, wildlife and natural resources can be devastating. Here we offer tips and strategies on how to prevent, prepare for and cope with a wildfire.

Note — This information is intended as a guideline only. Always follow any specific instructions provided by local authorities.

Preventing Wildfires

To protect yourself and your environment from wildfires, contact your local fire department or forestry office for information on fire laws in your area — and strictly follow them. In addition, follow these wildfire safety practices:

  • Report hazardous conditions that could cause a wildfire. For instance, if you see smoldering campfires or smoking hazards that are not properly extinguished, notify your local fire department immediately.
  • If you must build a campfire, follow any posted or local rules or regulations. Also, keep the campfire small and build it away from overhanging branches, dry grass and leaves, and rotten stumps or logs. Scrape away litter or other burnable material within a 10-foot circle to keep the campfire from spreading. Keep plenty of water handy and make sure the fire is completely doused — stir it and douse it again to be sure — and that the coals are cold before leaving.
  • Where smoking is permitted, smoke only in clearings where there are at least three feet around you on all sides. Grind out the cigarette, cigar or tobacco in the dirt, never on a stump or log.
  • Follow all manufacturers’ instructions when using lanterns, stoves, or heaters outdoors. Always make sure they are completely cool before refueling and move the appliance to a new clearing before lighting it, especially if fuel spills when filling it. Never light lanterns, stoves or heaters inside a tent, trailer, or camper. If you move them inside, make sure there is adequate ventilation.
  • If you must burn trash or debris, observe local regulations (it is not legal to do so in some communities; others have specific regulations). Do not burn on the ground where ashes or sparks can be blown around; use a container placed in an area clear from branches and overhead wires.
  • Make sure your vehicle’s spark arrester is working properly by checking with the dealer or a mechanic. If you use other equipment such as chain saws, generators, trail bikes, etc., in wooded areas, they too must be equipped with working spark arresters.

Protecting Your Family and Home from Fires

As a safety precaution, learn about your community’s risk for wildfires by contacting your local emergency management office, planning and zoning department or forestry office. They can usually provide valuable information on how to safeguard your home and how to react when a wildfire is a threat.

In addition, the following safety tips may help:

  • Install smoke detectors on each level of your home. Test them monthly and change batteries at least once a year.
  • Make sure all family members know where the fire extinguisher is located and how to use it.
  • Clean roofs and gutters regularly. Inspect chimneys at least twice a year and have them cleaned annually. Chimneys and stovepipes should also be equipped with spark arresters.
  • Clear flammable shrubs, leaves, dead limbs, and twigs within a 30- to 100-foot zone around your home and beneath porches and decks. Stack firewood at least 100 feet away and uphill from your home.
  • Store flammable materials such as gasoline, oil, kerosene, turpentine, etc., in approved safety containers and away from the base of your home.
  • Maintain a garden hose that can reach all areas of your home and identify another outside water source such as a hydrant, swimming pool, pond, etc., that can be utilized in case of fire.
  • Consider investing in protective shutters or fire-resistant drapes.
  • Develop an evacuation plan with your family.
  • Assemble a disaster supplies kit that contains: a first aid kit, an emergency cash fund, canned food and can opener, at least three gallons of water per person, a change of clothing and footwear, bedding and/or sleeping bags, a battery-powered radio and flashlights (including extra batteries), and any essential items for children, pets, or elderly and/or disabled family members (medications, diapers, warm clothing, etc.).
  • Talk to your insurance agent to make sure that all of your insurance policies are up to date and contain adequate coverage.
  • Keep insurance policies, photographs of your home and valuables (for insurance purposes, should they be damaged or destroyed), legal documents, and other valuables in a safe deposit box or fireproof and waterproof container.

Important Note about Roofs

It’s important to know the difference between a flammable and non-flammable roof. It is almost impossible to prevent a wood shingle roofed house from igniting if it is in the path of a wildfire. And once ignited, few professional firefighters will make even a token attempt to put out the flames, knowing that this effort is almost futile. Fire crews must quickly assess what can be saved and/or what can be defended when multiple structures are involved. A house with a wood shingle roof will not even be considered unless nothing else exists.

If you live in an area in which wildfires occur, your number one priority to protect your home must be to ensure that the roof is made out of a fireproof or Class A fire-resistant material.

When a Wildfire Threatens Your Community

If wildfires are threatening your community, listen regularly to your local radio or television stations for updated reports and evacuation information. In addition, take the following steps:

  • Create an emergency plan with your family and make sure you all understand it. Make plans for evacuation and care of pets as well.
  • Back your car into the garage or park it facing the route of escape. Close the garage and car doors and windows against smoke and disconnect automatic garage door openers (in case of power failure) so you can make a fast getaway. Also, know where your keys are so you can leave in a hurry.
  • Smoke and ash from the fires can cause poor air quality. Stay inside and use an air conditioner, preferably with an air filter, if you have health problems, especially asthma, emphysema, other lung problems or heart conditions. People who are not at risk for health problems should still be cautious and avoid exercising if the air is hazy and/or causes coughing or irritation.
  • If possible, arrange to stay with a friend or relative in a safe area if you are instructed to evacuate.

If you are instructed to evacuate:

  • Do so immediately. Go to designated community shelter areas and, if possible, notify a relative or friend in another part of the country of your plans and your whereabouts. Listen to instructions carefully and allow yourself as much time as possible.
  • Wear protective clothing (i.e., sturdy shoes, cotton or wool pants and long-sleeved shirt, gloves, and a handkerchief to cover your face) to prevent burns.
  • Take your disaster supplies kit (as described above).
  • Keep mobile phones and/or two-way radios handy to communicate in case of emergency.
  • Choose an escape route as far as possible from the fire.

If you’re sure you have time before you evacuate:

  • Close windows, doors, vents, Venetian blinds or non-combustible window coverings, and heavy drapes. Remove flammable or lightweight curtains.
  • Turn off gas at the meter and pilot lights. (Note — You will need to have a professional turn the gas back on.)
  • Open the fireplace damper and close fireplace screens.
  • Turn on lights in each room to make your house more visible through heavy smoke.
  • Seal attic and ground vents with plywood or commercially available seals.
  • Connect the garden hose to outside taps. Wet the roof and/or place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near fuel tanks. Wet or remove shrubs within 15 feet of your home.
  • Move flammable patio furniture indoors.

Disaster Relief

In the aftermath of a fire, there will probably be many pressing issues to take care of, but your first priority should be your own safety and that of your family. If you are in need of emergency services (shelter, clothing, food, money, etc.), contact one of the emergency hotlines listed in the Emergency Resources section at the end of this digest. In addition, safeguard yourself and your family by taking the following tips into consideration:

  • Listen to a portable radio for information on shelters, helpful resources, and safety advisories.
  • Stay out of and away from damaged buildings. Return home only when authorities say it is safe. Children and pets should be constantly supervised.
  • Be alert for potential hazards. Take extreme care when moving in an area damaged by fire.
  • Cooperate with authorities. Whether you’re asked to relinquish telephone lines, keep off emergency roads or given other directions, do your best to comply.
  • Remember to help others who may require special assistance — children, the elderly, and people with disabilities.

What to Do if Your Home Is Damaged or Destroyed

If there is a federal disaster declaration, a telephone “hotline” is usually made available to provide information about public, private, and voluntary agency programs to help you recover from the fire.

When assessing the damage to your home, use extreme caution. Watch for hidden dangers: areas that are still hot, falling structures, sharp metal, and other potential hazards. If you have insurance, make a detailed list of the damages and contact your insurance representative as soon as possible. If you aren’t able to call from your home, tell your agent where you can be reached — and try to be patient. Where there is extensive and widespread damage, insurance representatives usually handle claims on an as-needed basis, beginning with the most serious situations. Property insurance typically protects against financial loss due to damages incurred to real estate and/or personal property, but policies vary and many have exclusions. Read your policy carefully and contact your agent with specific questions about coverage or the claims process. In addition, the following tips may help:

  • Consider hiring a reliable contractor to make repairs — but beware of frauds who prey on disaster victims. Your best bet is to get a reference from friends, neighbors, or co-workers who have had home improvement done. Get written estimates from several firms. Ask for explanations for price variations. Don’t automatically choose the lowest bidder. Be sure to get a signed contract from any contractor with whom you agree to work.
  • Take pictures of the damage — both to the house and your possessions — for insurance purposes.
  • Make temporary repairs to prevent further damage from rain, wind, or looting.
  • Keep all repair receipts for your insurance agent.
  • If you have to rebuild your home, check local building codes and ordinances to find out about fire-resistant designs and noncombustible materials that may help reduce the damaging effects of wildfires in the future. For example, use fire-resistant shingles or replace vinyl siding with other materials, such as stucco, that are less likely to melt. (See previous information.)

Emergency Resources

Numerous shelters are typically set up in the event of a natural disaster. To find the shelter nearest you, check your local newspaper, contact your local Red Cross chapter or emergency management service, or call one of the hotlines below. In addition, some of these organizations may be able to provide temporary housing or financial aid to families who have lost their homes.

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA): 800-462-9029

(or 800-462-7585 for the hearing- and speech-impaired)

Red Cross Hotline: 800-HELP-NOW (800-435-7669)

Resources Are Available

For additional assistance please contact your WorkLife Solutions program toll free at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006 or visit www.magellanHealth.com/member using the toll free number. Call us for more information, help, and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

 


Wildfires – Being Prepared For an Evacuation

When a natural disaster strikes, such as the recent wildfires in Colorado and other states, you need to be prepared to evacuate immediately. Wildfires are especially dangerous because all it takes is a shift in the wind to threaten your area. If your community is threatened by a wildfire, you will most likely have little time to prepare yourself. In the ensuing chaos and confusion, you may not be thinking clearly about what you need to do and take with you.

In case of evacuation, below are recommended tips from the American Red Cross. Keep this tip sheet handy and use it to prepare in advance to ensure your family’s and your home’s safety as much as possible.

Immediate Evacuation

If you have been advised to evacuate the area, do so immediately. These warnings come from officials who know when there is imminent danger. Heed their warnings and evacuate. You cannot put a price on a life but you can always rebuild your home.

Things to Do When Evacuating

  • Wear protective clothing—sturdy shoes, cotton or woolen clothing, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, gloves, and a handkerchief to protect your face.
  • Take emergency supplies (see list below).
  • Lock your home.
  • Tell someone who does not live in the evacuated area when you left and where you are going. Be sure to check in with them when you arrive at your destination.
  • Choose a route away from fire hazards. Watch for changes in the speed and direction of fire and smoke.

Things to Take With You

  • Pets
  • Eyeglasses
  • Car keys
  • Cell phone
  • Change of clothes
  • Prescription medications in their original bottles
  • Checkbook, cash, and credit cards
  • Insurance documents
  • Personal identification
  • Social Security Card
  • Proof of residence
  • Birth and Marriage Certificates
  • Stocks, bonds, and other negotiable certificates
  • Wills, deeds, and copies of recent tax returns
  • Irreplaceable photos

Keep receipts for all expenses incurred while you are evacuated. You will need them when you are working with your insurance company.

If You're Sure You Have Time, Take Steps to Protect Your Home

Inside:

  • Close windows, vents, doors, blinds or non-combustible window coverings, and heavy drapes. Remove lightweight curtains.
  • Shut off gas at the meter. Turn off pilot lights.
  • Open fireplace damper. Close fireplace screens.
  • Move flammable furniture into the center of the home away from windows and sliding-glass doors.
  • Turn on a light in each room to increase the visibility of your home in heavy smoke.

Outside:

  • Seal attic and ground vents with pre-cut plywood or commercial seals.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Place combustible patio furniture inside.
  • Connect the garden hose to outside taps.
  • Set up the portable gasoline-powered pump.
  • Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above-ground fuel tanks. Wet the roof.
  • Wet or remove shrubs within 15 feet of the home.
  • Gather fire tools.

Emergency Supplies

When danger is close to your area, prepare an emergency supply kit. Store these supplies in sturdy, easy-to-carry containers. You will be thankful in the long run.

  • A three-day supply of water (one gallon per person per day) and food that won’t spoil.
  • One change of clothing and footwear per person and one blanket or sleeping bag per person.
  • A first aid kit that includes your family’s prescription medications.
  • Emergency tools including a battery-powered radio, flashlight, and plenty of extra batteries.
  • An extra set of car keys and a credit card, cash, or traveler’s checks.
  • Sanitation supplies.
  • Special items for infant, elderly, or disabled family members.
  • An extra pair of eyeglasses.
  • Keep important family documents in a waterproof container. Assemble a smaller version of your kit to keep in the trunk of your car.

Resources Are Available

For additional assistance please contact your WorkLife Solutions program toll free at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006 or visit www.magellanHealth.com/member using the toll free number. Call us for more information, help, and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

 


Emergency Preparedness at Home

When a disaster such as the recent wildfires in Colorado strikes, many are left with a sense of panic and vulnerability. If you are anxious about how you and your family would fare in an emergency, take some action to prepare your home. Below are some basic steps you can follow to ease anxiety and increase preparedness. Discuss these ideas with your family. Then prepare an emergency plan. Post the plan where everyone will see it — on the refrigerator or bulletin board.

Emergency Checklist for Home

  • Learn how you would be warned of an emergency at home or at your children’s school/day care.
  • Create an emergency plan (see below).
  • Make an evacuation plan and practice it with your family.
  • Learn your community’s evacuation routes.
  • Ask about emergency procedures and plans for your children’s school/day care.
  • Keep family records in a waterproof and fireproof container.

Create an Emergency Plan

  • Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of natural disasters such as fire, severe weather, and earthquakes. Use your discretion in discussing dangers of bomb threats, bio-chemical threats, etc.
  • Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.
  • Discuss what to do about power outages and personal injuries.
  • Draw a floor plan of your home. Mark two escape routes from each room.
  • Learn how to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at main switches.
  • Post emergency telephone numbers near telephones.
  • Teach children how and when to call 911, police, and fire.
  • Instruct household members to turn on the radio for emergency information.
  • Pick one out-of-state and one local friend or relative for family members to call if separated by disaster (it is often easier to call out-of-state than within the affected area).
  • Teach children how to make long distance telephone calls.
  • Pick two meeting places.
    1. A place near your home in case of an emergency.
    2. A place outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after a disaster.

Prepare a Disaster Supplies Kit

Assemble supplies you might need in an evacuation. For smaller items, store them in an easy-to-carry container, such as a backpack or duffle bag.

Include:

  • A supply of water (one gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers. Identify the storage date and replace every six months.
  • A supply of non-perishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A change of clothing, rain gear, and sturdy shoes.
  • A first aid kit and prescription medications.
  • A battery-powered radio, flashlight, and plenty of extra batteries.
  • A list of family physicians.

Additional items may include:

  • Blankets or sleeping bags.
  • An extra pair of glasses.
  • Credit cards and cash.
  • An extra set of car keys.
  • A list of important family information; the style and serial number of medical devices, such as pacemakers.
  • Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.

Prepare an Emergency Car Kit

Include:

  • Battery-powered radio and extra batteries.
  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • Booster cables.
  • Fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type).
  • First aid kit and manual.
  • Bottled water and non-perishable high-energy foods, such as granola bars, raisins, and peanut butter.
  • Tire repair kit and pump.

 Resources Are Available

For additional assistance please contact your WorkLife Solutions program toll free at 1-800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006 or visit www.magellanHealth.com/member using the toll free number. Call us for more information, help, and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

 


Hurricane Disaster Relief

Our hearts go out to all those affected by the current hurricane season. Now, and in the days and weeks ahead, Magellan understands that there will be a need for help, comfort and information. Please remember that there is support available to you and your family through your Magellan program. Log on to www.MagellanHealth.com/member or call your dedicated toll-free program number for help.

If you are in need of emergency services (shelter, clothing, food, money, etc.) contact one of the emergency hotlines listed in the Emergency Resources section at the end of this article. In addition, safeguard yourself and your family by taking the following tips into consideration:

  • Listen to a portable radio for information on shelters, helpful resources, and safety advisories. Be alert for tornadoes ("spin-off" storms).
  • Stay out of and away from damaged buildings. Return home only when authorities say it is safe. Children should be constantly supervised.
  • Be alert for potential hazards. Take extreme care when moving in an area damaged by a hurricane. It is possible that shattered glass, splintered wood, or other sharp objects will be strewn around.
  • Cooperate with authorities. Whether you’re asked to relinquish phone lines, keep off emergency roads or given other directions, do your best to comply.
  • Use caution when traveling. Major storms can create weakened roads or bridges, and broken or downed live power lines.
  • Be cautious with food. When electricity is out, refrigerated foods can spoil quickly; throw out any food that is questionable. Frozen foods will typically last in a closed freezer for several days.
  • Be cautious with drinking water. Hurricanes can contaminate local reservoirs. Radio reports will typically notify residents if tap water is safe to drink. Try to drink bottled water until you know for sure. On average, you need three gallons of water per family member per day. (Tip — You can obtain safe water by melting ice cubes.)
  • Remember to help others who may require special assistance — infants, the elderly, and people with disabilities.

Caring For Yourself

Disasters such as a hurricane can result in extreme emotions including stress, helplessness, fear, irritability, anger, and depression. You may also suffer from nightmares, shock, loss of appetite, and the inability to concentrate. All of these reactions and feelings are normal, but if you do not address them, you can jeopardize your health. If you or a family member is unable to cope, do not hesitate to get help. Many temporary shelters offer free counseling services to victims — or referrals to professionals who can provide further assistance. In addition, consider the following tips:

  • Have realistic expectations and goals, and be patient with yourself.
  • Reach out to supportive friends and family for comfort and guidance.
  • Give yourself plenty of time to recover and rest.
  • Try to maintain a nutritious diet to keep your energy up.
  • Focus on your breathing — deep, slow breaths will help calm you.

Join a support group. You can find support groups through your doctor, listed in your local newspaper, or through local Red Cross chapters.

What To Do If Your Home Is Damaged Or Destroyed

When assessing the damage to your home, use extreme caution. Watch for hidden dangers: flooded areas, falling structures, sharp metal, fires, and other potential hazards. The following tips may help:

  • If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, you may have a gas leak. In this case, open a window and quickly leave. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve, if possible, and call the gas company from a neighbor’s telephone or a pay phone. Note — If you turn off the gas, it must be turned back on by a professional.
  • Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches, gasoline, or other flammable liquids immediately.
  • If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, call an electrician. You may need to turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker; however, if there is a lot of water on the ground, this may be hazardous, so have an electrician do it for you.
  • If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap.
  • Consider hiring a reliable contractor — but beware of frauds who prey on disaster victims. Your best bet is to get a reference from friends, neighbors, or co-workers who have had improvement work done. Get written estimates from several firms. Ask for explanations for price variations. Don’t automatically choose the lowest bidder. Be sure to get a signed contract from any contractor you agree to work with.

Home Owner’s And Renter’s Insurance

If you have insurance, make a detailed list of the damages and contact your insurance representative as soon as possible. If you aren't able to call from home, tell your agent where you can be reached — and try to be patient. Where there is extensive and widespread damage, insurance representatives usually handle claims on an as-needed basis, beginning with the most serious situations.

Property insurance typically protects against the financial loss due to damages incurred to real and/or personal property, but policies vary, and many have exclusions. For example, many policies do not cover damage caused by flooding, unless you have purchased additional flood coverage. Therefore, read your policy carefully and contact your agent with specific questions about coverage or the claims process.

In addition, the following tips may help:

  • Take pictures of the damage — both to the house and your possessions — for insurance purposes.
  • Make temporary repairs to prevent further damage from rain, wind or looting. If windows are broken, nail boards or staple gun heavy plastic or tarps in their place.
  • Keep all repair receipts for your insurance agent.

Safeguarding Yourself And Your Family In The Future

To protect yourself, your family and your home from future disasters, consider taking the proactive steps listed at the beginning of this article now. If you are rebuilding your home, check local building codes and ordinances to find out about wind-resistant designs and reinforced masonry work that may help reduce the damaging effects of hurricanes in the future. The Red Cross and other organizations may also be able to provide safety tips that can help prepare your family in the event f future emergencies.

Resources Are Available – For assistance please contact your WorkLife Solutions program at 1-800-234-1327, or TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006.

Additional information, self-help tools, and other resources are available online at www.MagellanHealth.com/member. Or call us for more information, help, and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

 


Working With Insurance Companies and Personal Finances After a Natural Disaster

If you have recently had property damage to your home or car due to a natural disaster, the following information may provide some tips on how to effectively work with your insurance company to file any necessary claims.

First, if there is the potential for further damage to your property, you should act quickly to try and prevent it, if reasonably possible. However, if you’ve been ordered to evacuate the neighborhood, or your structure is not safe, it is not worth the risk to you.

The next consideration is whether you can locate your insurance policy. If you are not able to find it, or you know it’s been destroyed, contact your state insurance department to get the phone number for your carrier to request your policy information and a copy of your policy. For an online reference for contact information for your state’s insurance department, use this link: http://www.naic.org/state_web_map.htm.

To prepare for filing the insurance claim, write down the date the damage occurred and your policy number. It is also important to have a telephone and/or email address where you can be reached at all times. These are items the insurer will need for your claim. Depending on your insurance company and the situation, you may have up to six months to file a claim. However, you should check with your insurance company to make sure.

In addition, it helps to know your deductible for each type of claim to determine whether it is worth filing a claim for all of the damage, or just the most expensive part. If the cost of repair exceeds the deductible by just a few dollars, you may not want to have a claim history for an expense that you will be covered mainly out of your own pocket. It is unfortunate, but still a fact, too many claims can cause your insurer to cancel coverage. Ask your insurer what your deductibles are if you are uncertain.

Next, separate damaged from undamaged property. Your insurer will need evidence of the damage to your home and possessions to prepare your repair estimate.

If the insurer requests you get an estimate of the damage for your home, contact a home repair contractor for an estimate. For vehicle damage, contact the repair shop you would like to use for the repair to get an estimate. Always ask if the estimate costs you anything before agreeing to have it done. Be aware that there are shady contractors and auto repair shops that will take advantage of you and your insurer by inflating the estimate, or charging to provide it. If you can, get more than one estimate to make sure you have been given a fair ballpark figure of what the repair will cost. However, when many people in an area have had property damage, it may be hard to get even one estimate in a timely way.

In addition,

  • If possible, take photographs of all of the damaged property, including discarded objects, structural damage, and any standing floodwater levels.
  • Make a list of damaged or lost items and include their date of purchase, value, and receipts, if possible.
  • Officials may require disposal of damaged items so, if possible, place damaged items outside of the home.

The insurance company will then likely send out an inspector or adjustor to examine the damage and write a report. These inspectors or adjustors work for the insurance company. If you have a legitimate claim, you should expect to be treated fairly and expect the insurance company to honor the claim. If you have any problems with the inspector during the inspection process, you should document the details of the situation and contact the insurance company to file a complaint.

After the adjustor files the report, different companies and different policies are processed in a variety of ways. If you are not given an immediate answer, ten days is a reasonable time to wait. If you haven’t heard anything about your claim, call. If for any reason your claim is denied, check to see if the company has an appeal process. It may be worth your while to appeal, especially if the repair is a costly one.

Keep in mind that insurance companies will differentiate between water damage due to wind and hail and water damage due to flood. Flood insurance is considered separate coverage and you are covered for flood damage only if you had purchased flood insurance in addition to your homeowner’s policy.

When rain enters through a wind-damaged window or door, or comes through a hole in a wall or roof, insurers consider the resulting puddles and damage to be windstorm-related, not flood-related. The good news is that most homeowners insurance provides such coverage for wind and hail damage.

According to www.floodsmart.gov, the official website of the NFIP (National Flood Insurance Program), “Flood insurance covers overflow of inland or tidal waters and unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source. However, the flood must be a general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties (at least one of which is yours).” If you do not have flood insurance and are interested in purchasing flood insurance for any future flood concerns, check with your insurer or the www.floodsmart.gov website for more information.

For any uninsured property damage, consider an SBA loan. The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) can make federally subsidized loans to repair or replace homes, personal property, or businesses that sustained damages not covered by insurance. For more information, check with FEMA at http://www.fema.gov/assistance/process/sba_assistance.shtm.

In the next section, we have answers to common questions regarding personal financial matters for those experiencing temporary problems due to weather-related loss.

Financial FAQs

 

Housing: What do I do about the home I own and cannot access; do I pay the mortgage?

You still own the property and if you have a mortgage, there is debt, so you need to research your situation with your lender. Consider contacting FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Assistance) online at www.fema.gov or by phone, (800) 621-3362/TTY (800) 462-7585, as they may have general input as to your rights under a declared disaster. There may be some relief under federal law that is part of the declaration of the disaster. In addition, contact your lender and review your options and requirements. Your lender may have a loss mitigation department available to answer your questions. If your home is funded via FHA, VA, or HUD, contact a HUD Housing Counseling Center. Call the HUD referral line to reach the nearest HUD Housing Counseling Center at 800 569-4287 for an appointment.

Rental housing: Do I need to pay my rent?

Contact FEMA online at www.fema.gov or by phone, (800) 621-3362 / TTY (800) 462-7585 to clarify your rights under a declared disaster. If you are not able to return or use the rental, and it is declared a disaster and uninhabitable, you may not need to pay from the period of the declaration on, but you are still responsible for rent up to the declaration. Also, contact your landlord, once you know the status/use of the rental and advise of your intent, (document the conversation date, etc.) when the rental is uninhabitable.

Utilities: Do I need to pay?

If your area was declared a national disaster, then most likely all utilities were shut off.You must contact the utility companies for advice, including telephone, water, electric, gas, and garbage. It is assumed that if the utilities are shut off, that your billing will cease, but that must be verified by contacting the utility companies. You are certainly responsible for all prior billings. Again, FEMA may have information on your rights and responsibilities as it relates to this situation. Contact FEMA online at www.fema.gov or by phone (800) 621-3362 / TTY (800) 462-7585.

Credit Cards – Personal Loans/Car loans/Leases/Student Loans

All debt related expenses/loans still exist and you are responsible. Contact each card company, financial institution, leasing company, and the lender on student loans for direction as to your responsibility. Most will have programs in place, for either a delay or hardship, but you must contact the program. For car loans/leases you should contact your car insurance company for a loss. The carrier may be responsible if the loss is covered by your policy. If your car/truck is still in use, you will need to pay the loan/fee, but you should contact the creditor to ask if they will allow some grace period.

Insurance – homeowners/renters, car/truck, health and life coverage

Contact FEMA online, at www.fema.gov or by phone, (800) 621-3362 / TTY (800) 462-7585. They may be able to outline your rights under a declared disaster. You must contact the carrier for each type of insurance for their direction. Again, with a declared disaster there will be specific instructions/programs for your situation.

If you have a loss of home, car etc. the carrier will advise of action needed. Again, you are responsible for paying all past due premiums. For health, disability and life insurance, you are responsible, but contact the carrier for the status of payment.

For group health coverage, you will need to contact your employer for action they are taking. Also, contact the carrier for your group coverage to confirm coverage or other options, just in case your coverage is terminated for non-payment.

Resources Are Available - For assistance please contact your WorkLife Solutions program at 1-800-234-1327, or TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006.

Additional information, self-help tools, and other resources are available online at www.MagellanHealth.com/member. Or call us for more information, help, and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

The content hereof, together with any attachments, are subject to Federal and State Copyright and Trademark protections. This content may not be used, reproduced, or distributed in any manner, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of CLC Incorporated.

The information presented is not to be a substitute for seeking advice specific to your situation from a tax, legal, or financial professional. If tax, legal, or financial advice is required, contact a tax specialist, attorney, or financial advisor.

 


Tips for Responding to Children and Youth after Traumatic Events

Traumatic events, such as natural disasters, shootings, bombings, or other violent acts, can leave children feeling frightened, confused, and insecure.

Whether a child has personally experienced trauma, has seen the event on television, or has merely heard it discussed by adults, it is important for parents and educators to be informed and ready to help if stress reactions begin to occur.

Children respond to trauma in many different ways. Some may have reactions very soon after the event; others may do fine for weeks or months and then begin to show troubling behavior. Knowing the signs that are common at different ages can help parents and teachers recognize problems and respond appropriately.

Preschool Age

Children ages 1–5 find it particularly hard to adjust to change and loss. These youngsters have not yet developed their own coping skills, so they must depend on parents, family members, and teachers to help them through difficult times.

Young children may regress to an earlier behavioral stage after a violent or traumatic event. Preschoolers may resume thumb sucking or bed–wetting, or may become afraid of strangers, animals, darkness, or “monsters.” They may cling to a parent or teacher, or become very attached to a place where they feel safe. Changes in eating and sleeping habits are common, as are unexplainable aches and pains.

Other symptoms to watch for are disobedience, hyperactivity, speech difficulties, and aggressive or withdrawn behavior. Preschoolers may tell exaggerated stories about the traumatic event or may refer to it repeatedly.

Early Childhood

Children ages 5–11 may have some of the same reactions that younger children have. They also may withdraw from playgroups and friends, compete more for the attention of parents, fear going to school, allow school performance to drop, become aggressive, or find it hard to concentrate. These children also may return to more childish behaviors, such as asking to be fed or dressed.

Adolescence

Children ages 12–14 are likely to have vague physical complaints when under stress and may abandon chores, schoolwork, or other responsibilities they previously handled. Though they may compete vigorously for attention from parents and teachers, they also may withdraw, resist authority, become disruptive at home or in the classroom, or begin to experiment with high–risk behaviors such as alcohol or drug use.

These young people are at a developmental stage in which the opinions of others are very important. They need to be thought of as “normal” by their friends, and are less concerned about relating well with adults or participating in family activities they once enjoyed.

In later adolescence, teens may experience feelings of helplessness and guilt because they are unable to assume full adult responsibilities as the community responds to the traumatic event. Older teens may deny the extent of their reactions to the traumatic event.

How to Help

Reassurance is the key to helping children through a traumatic time. Very young children need a lot of cuddling as well as verbal support. Answer questions about the event honestly, but do not dwell on frightening details or allow the subject to dominate family or classroom time indefinitely. Encourage children of all ages to express emotions through conversation, writing, or artwork; and to find a way to help others who were affected by the event.

Try to maintain a normal household or classroom routine, and encourage children to participate in recreational activity. Temporarily reduce your expectations about performance in school or at home, perhaps by substituting less demanding responsibilities for normal chores.

Acknowledge that you, too, may have reactions associated with the traumatic event, and take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing.

Tips for Talking to Children After a Traumatic Event

  • Provide children with opportunities to talk about what they are seeing on television and to ask questions.
  • Do not be afraid to admit that you cannot answer all of their questions.
  • Answer questions at a level the children can understand.
  • Provide ongoing opportunities for children to talk. They probably will have more questions as time goes on.
  • Use this as an opportunity to establish a family emergency plan. Feeling that there is something you can do may be very comforting to both children and adults.
  • Allow children to discuss other fears and concerns about unrelated issues. This is a good opportunity to explore these issues also.
  • Monitor children’s television watching. Some parents may wish to limit their child’s exposure to graphic or troubling scenes. To the extent possible, be present when your child is watching news coverage of the event. It is at these times that questions might arise.
  • Help children understand that there are no bad emotions and that a wide range of reactions is normal. Encourage children to express their feelings to adults (including teachers) who can help them understand their sometimes strong and troubling emotions.
  • Be careful not to scapegoat or generalize about any particular cultural or ethnic group. Try not to focus on blame.
  • In addition to the tragic things they see, help children identify good things, such as heroic actions, families who unite and share support, and the assistance offered by people throughout the community.

When Talking Isn’t Enough

For some children more active interventions may be required, particularly if they were more directly affected by the traumatic event.

  • The family, as a unit, might consider counseling.
  • Traumatic events often reawaken a child’s fear of loss of parents (frequently a child’s greatest fear) at a time when parents may be preoccupied with their own practical and emotional difficulties.
  • Families may choose to permit temporary regressive behavior. Several arrangements may help children separate gradually after the agreed–upon time limit: spending extra time with parents immediately before bedtime, leaving the child’s bedroom door slightly ajar, and using a night–light.
  • Many parents have their own fears of leaving a child alone after a traumatic event or other fears they may be unable to acknowledge. Parents often are more able to seek help on the children’s behalf and may, in fact, use the children’s problems as a way of asking for help for themselves and other family members.
  • Teachers also can help children with art and play activities, as well as by encouraging group discussions in the classroom and informational presentations about the traumatic event.

Resources Are Available

Additional information, self-help tools, and other resources are available online at www.MagellanHealth.com/member. Or call us at 800-234-1327, TTY Users: 1-800-456-4006 for more information, help, and support. Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide confidential assistance at no cost to you.

OWCP

It is always recommended you file a CA-1 form in the event of an incident or accident. Signs and symptoms may occur immediately but could be delayed months or even years.

Further information regarding OWCP can be found on the NATCA website's OWCP Page.