This Week in NATCA/Labor History
Tuesday, May 10, 2011

 
THIS WEEK IN NATCA/ATC HISTORY:

May 10, 1990 — Rebuilding the controller work force: The FAA announces that Hampton University has been awarded a contract to develop a training program for air traffic controllers. One other institution—the Air Traffic Control Training Center in Eden Prairie, Minn.—also receives federal money as part of the Collegiate Training Initiative. Three other educational institutions subsequently join the program, but do not receive federal money. Graduates from the program are eligible to apply to the FAA as developmental controllers without attending the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City.

May 10-12, 1999 — NATCA Lobby Week: Nearly 300 participants attend “NATCA in Washington."


THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY:

1894:
Nationwide railway strike begins at Pullman, Ill. Ultimately, 260,000 railroad workers joined the strike to protest wage cuts by the Pullman Palace Car Co.

1909: The Canadian government establishes the Department of Labour. It took the U.S. another four years.

1980: UAW Pres. Douglas A. Fraser is named to the Chrysler Corp. board of directors, becoming the first union representative ever to sit on the board of a major U.S. corporation.

1997: Twelve thousand Steelworker-represented workers at Goodyear Tire & Rubber win an 18-day strike for improved wages and job security.